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CSPAN
Nov 2, 2013 6:00am EDT
kabul years before. it just simply was too dangerous. it is still a dangerous place, by the way. i don't want to sound pollyannish here. things havent is changed for the better in afghanistan and the american people, sadly, don't know it. relative to the american by way ofy itself part of the story, of course, is the growth in the number of students. when it opened i think it with 53 students. there is now 1,000 students there. 300 of them are women. and they have a broad number of courses. i won't go into all those. on ann a a newd campus an international campus women's economic . defense dollars to open up a women's economic development school, a.i.d.?'t that why is it d.o.d.? significantly to the security of the country, but i think basically the answer is because the d.o.d. did a number of things including some of the commanders' expenditures which helped the development of that is so essential to its security and this is part of it. at thee story we got american university at a town meeting we had there is one hisdent we talked about life experience. when the taliban was there, he
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2013 7:29pm EST
the next 48 days. >> i don't think the estimates were -- >> i know the estimates weren't there, but if you do the math, that's how it works. i yield back. >> i thank the gentleman. i'm sorry that you have to look at his figures. in fact, the burn rate necessary to get done wasn't understood from day one. and the surge requirement at 4:30 in the afternoon or 5:30 in the afternoon pacific time wasn't in fact what you were looking at. because i know mr. vanroers kel would understand you need two or three or four times the capacity of when people are actually going to log on and try to do it. miss loomis is recognized. >> thank you, mr. chairman. mr. chao, you said high risk is a vulnerability that could be expected to have a severe or catastrophic adverse effect on individuals, or organizational operations or assets. i want to focus on the part about the severe or catastrophic adverse effect on individuals. is it true that there were two high risks that were continued to be found related to the market place information systems, but you weren't told about them at the time? >> i think you're re
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2013 2:00pm EST
like that for the people whom you are going to benefit, actually. i don't want to knock the idea that the thing is entirely useless but the whole thing is predicated on the assumption that somehow you can get rid of illegal immigrants. and therefore, what we want to do is come up with a set of penalties and incentives which will somehow reduce the influx of new illegal immigrants and will somehow get rid of the stop of illegal immigrants. and i don't think that those are possible feasible objectives. and for the very simple reason that each time we try and do something like this, at the washington level, things really get worse for the illegal immigrants and we don't really gain anything in terms of what is commonly known as controlling our borders. and the main reason is that we have a right brain-left brain approach to illegal immigrants. the right brain says they are immigrants and therefore we should be kind to them. we should be considerate to them. but the left brain says oh but they're illegal and therefore we believe in the rule of law and therefore we should be unkind to
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 7:00am EST
or maim another human being? i don't understand where the disconnect is in terms of federal or state system. >> i think it gets down to the difference between rage on the one hand and lopez on the other which this court held as a rational way to regulate commerce to prohibit certain items. >> there is no dispute that these chemicals were transported along interstate lines. that is not even disputed. >> i don't finger was disputed in lopez, the firearm would have to cross state lines the the problem in lopez was the federal statute was not structured in a way that had a jurisdictional nexus that made the statute applicable as a regulation. >> this case to decide the commerce clause question. the government didn't even a search it. they assert it now but as we took the case the issue was whether the treaty supported the laws. >> that is right, just as scalia and the government like a private party can wave a constitutional argument but on the other hand i would say we are not particularly concerned about the commerce clause argument because it has the same basic defect as the treaty po
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2013 4:10am EST
a lot of other sources that have become fragmented, young people don't watch television anymore very kill daret they watch and john stewart and frankly those are important news sources. they have a lot of influence among young people. everybody else, they maybe watch a little bit of this or that or they don't watch news at all because it's all very discouraging. so you have a message being delivered in a very consistent one ful repetitive way on side and then you have mush for the rest. and that's where we're at for a while now. for not going to be easy anybody even if they had a lot of money, to change that. it is true that fox's viewership is gradually waning because new re not bringing on viewers. but when we interviewed grassroots tea partiers, the seventh question in the interview is where are you getting your news. it and kept itat on all day. the national surveys show that's pretty much the story for -- for really ervative -- conservative-minded people right now. >> two more? okay. >> ray piercy. i want to thank you for shedding analytical matters. it hasn't been part of the u
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2013 8:00pm EST
that don't have a high value. what we did was initiate reform. those were a part of it. and the biggest in the state were most of the school districts had to buy from one company. by pulling back on collective gardening, school districts can bid on health insurance and districts are saving tens of millions. and other changes beyond the fiscal leave are happening. at the federal level, it was more than half of the budget; aid to local government. so anything we did to balance the budget, besides massive cuts, required reforms in those area and same thing at the national level. and those areas you have to in act reform and many of them don't happen to current beneficiaries. we made the changes to current ones and balancing the budget and you make a convincing argument there are schools and governments better today than they were in the past. >> your co-author said at aei your moderate in temper, but not in policy. and you write moving to the center, doesn't mean you have to move to the center. how do you think you will fair with right-to-life positions, which are a good deal more st n st
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2013 8:29pm EST
to us before making those statements. i don't know if we authorized that statement to be made. the point is that if we allow the companies on an annual basis to publish these statistics, it it's going to simply provide additional information out there as new companies come online and pop up you may have a company that for a period of years shows no orders and then all of a sudden starts showing orders and that conveys a message that says, we have the capability to collect this now. the more detail we provide out there and the more we break this down by authorities and companies, the more easy it becomes for our adversaries to know where to talk and where not to talk. what we have agreed to allow the companies to do is to report the aggregate number of times in which they provide information to the government and that seems to me is an adequate way of providing the public the information they need to know about the minuscule proportion of times in which that actually happens and breaking it down nurt in our view crosses the line of the balance between transparency and national security. >
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2013 5:29am EST
of patriarchy and couldn't decide when to have children. we're walking around on a history that we don't know. and there are many women trying to bring it back. and there's a friend whose work you should look up as well. who has written a book called everything we want once was here. and that's not only true of native cultures in this country, but also of cultures in southern afterry car, who will take you out into the desert and dig a hole and show you what they use for contraception, for headaches, migraines. it's true of the original cultures of 95% of human history. don't let anyone tell you that it's human nature that we live this way. no, it once was different, and it still could be. native women are very funny about it, you have to have a sense of humor, given what they've gone through. what did columbus call -- primitive, equal women. >> we are almost out of time, we have one more question. before that, just a couple housekeeping matters. first of all, i'd like to remind you about our upcoming speakers. on december 3rd, we have manuel santos, the president of columbia, on december 16t
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2013 11:00pm EST
can't be the leader of it? >> i don't think it -- i don't think an independent candidate can possibly win a three-way race. if you think about it. you run a three-way race and translate to a morality of the electorial college vote. get to the house where each state gets one vote and republicans have 30 odd delegations. it's a virtual yule impossibility for the presidency. what i wish that americans elect would do is say instead of trying to get candidates to run or path and run for a job that is impossible for them to win is encourage independent candidates. people who are ceo or university presidents, community leaders to run as independents for the house and for the senate. >> yeah. >> there is nothing wrong with the senate that three or four legitimately independent senators could fix. it could go a long way. there's a structure barrier on the presidential side. there simply can't be -- >> you agree. >> that was sort of -- trying to finish my thought. that's what i'm shocked at. what where the 2014 candidates? it would be so easy -- i look at my home state of florida and w
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2013 11:00pm EST
look at the history of you le iii prosecutions, will see that they don't take nearly as long as those that military system. which is not to say some cases should not be brought in the indicated stem as i on the day i announced the determination. we heard some to the military commission process. you look at the hundreds of cases that you brought to the article iii courts, we've shown that we can effective. we can do them relatively quickly and we can get the results that are consistent with facts. we hold people accountable. we hold people accountable. >> tried to construct the case we'll be ablethat at a share as much information -- not just make an much cement, but share as information as we can with regard to that determination. >> one more? >> one more. prison ate hearing on reform? what would you like to see congress pass to change the way operates?ystem >> i talked about that in a peech in san francisco in august. august. broken.he system was didn't just mean the federal system. we immediate the deal with criminal have in the system. deal with deficits. release ple better and th
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2013 12:00pm EST
that happen? because the picture is much, much better than that number. i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or fuller picture of the events in afghanistan. i believe that the press has missed a good story. it hasn't missed the problems. it has missed the progress. the impression that our people get doesn't come from either. it comes from what they read or hear or see and what they have which is fair game. and they should be brought into the light and disclosed and written about and talked about. but what has been missing, i believe, is the part of the afghan story which represents real progress so that the american people have been deprived, denied the sense of success or at least partial success which i believe they are entitled to because of the loss of blood and treasure by our people. i think it is a sad -- it is sad that our people don't have that sense that hey, we have made some progress in afghanistan. the picture basically has just been too one-sided focused just too much on failure and on discord. to leave you now have to decide what we are going to do, what
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2013 6:00am EST
what they think we are trying to do. this is all they knew. there are things about them that they don't like and so forth. it is certainly not going to change. they have their narrative. what is ours? they took over our embassy. we have all seen "argo." great movie. i loved it. i've seen it twice. despite how inaccurate was, i still liked it. second of all, the iranian support terrorist and extremist groups. they absolutely do. there was an attack on the jewish community center of what aires.uenos they deny the holocaust. i was invited to believe it or -- i was invited to a meeting in tehran that the holocaust did not happen. there was a holocaust denier. i cannot make it. i had a conflict. there are people that do deny the holocaust. they threaten to destroy israel. it is american policy. it was astounding. we are the great savers. satan.great they are the axis of evil. there are competing narratives. both work in mobilizing negative energy. what is going to happen? what do we know? this is the one i think is the most important. i have spent my life, i'm reading things about iran and
CSPAN
Nov 14, 2013 11:00pm EST
experience. if our biggest problem is that enough people who don't have ?urnses aren't signing up quick enough for insurance, that's a problem that i will accept because it's a problem we can fix. if all we talk about here here is the pace, where people go from uninsured to insured, and we can fix that because we know the product is good. senator boxer talked about the massachusetts experience in which during the first month of their enrollment for the massachusetts exchange, only .3 #% of the total signed up during that month. why? because people take time. this is not animal easy decision to sign up for health care. in connecticut where we have an exchang that's up and running, a wbsz thabs working, the first month, know our number? it was not.# # #%, but enrolled 10% of the expected total in the first 30 days, and here's what people say about their experience with connecticut's exchange. one said, this is a great resource for cops residents to apply for health coverage, thanks to the health care law. another said, i chose access health because i've been denied in the past by other ca
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 2:29am EST
. i don't think that is all that helpful because you really are not giving people an idea of how much is -- you're mixing apples and oranges. how many wiretaps and mobsters. to me it it doesn't create the kind of transparency that creates the kind of knowledge the american people. i have some time. >> i guess i can go. over my own time. i have seconds and will try to answer a question. i understand that you think that my bill would require too much e detail. i'm going to weigh that feedback very carefully. but i do want to point out that when i drafted the government reporting requirements and the bill i modelled them after the wiretap report that they release every year. if you look at last year's report it breaks down the number of wiretaps by specific jurisdiction and breaks down those numbers by the nature of the wiretap. last year's wiretap report shows that federal prosecutors in manhattan secured wiretap orders for mobile phones 48 times in 201 while their colleagues only broke them five times in the same period. the wiretap report contains a wealth of information and nobody is
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2013 11:29pm EST
and knowing who -- most americans don't know who their state legislators are, and that's why they are able to -- an anti-choice right wing minority is able to do this state by state. and it is very much about backlash against the changes in this country. i mean, they're very clear. white women are not having enough children, they say to me. you know, and it's why the issues all go together. so, you know, anti-immigration, anti-birth control, anti-abortion and so on. so we have to take back our state legislatures. >> citing the example of working moms versus stay-at-home moms, a questioner asked, what are your thoughts on the way women treat each other? >> well, if we were ever asked a question that included men, we might give a better answer. i mean, do we ever ask men, can you have it all? you know, we need work patterns that allow everybody to work and also have a life and have kids if they want to. men too. the whole idea of stay-at-home moms and moms who -- i mean, the language is bananas. women who work at home work harder than any other class of worker in the united states, longer ho
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2013 4:00pm EST
justice. if we don't adopt this bill, we won't require -- these are in the bill. these protections are -- just let me finish this paragraph, then i would be happy to. we won't require commanders to immediately refer all allegations of sexual assault to professional criminal investigators. we won't restrict the authority of senior officers to modify the findings and sentence of court-martial convictions. we won't require higher level review of any decision not to prosecute allegations of sexual assault. i would be happy to yield. i will put the balance of my statement in the record. the presiding officer: all time has expired. mr. inhofe: i have a parliamentary inquiry. we were to be given equal time for the last ten minutes. i had three minutes and all i want to do is ask a question. am i -- mr. levin: i ask unanimous consent that that be allowed. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. inhofe: everything that my chairman has said i agree with. he's making my speech for me. it's critical that we get the bill. all i'm saying is i made the statement yesterday, that republicans
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2013 10:00am EST
society. so the gillibrand amendment, of course, is we don't trust those commanders. when we trust these young people with their lives. we ask them to have the ultimate responsibility which is that of defending this nation, but we don't trust them to prosecute, to do their job, to do their duties. .. i've had with the men and women who are in command and the senior petty officers, the master chief petty officers and the master sergeants that are responsible for the good order and discipline of our men and women in our armed forces. so i won't go into the fact that this gillibrand amendment includes things like burglary and house breaking and perjury and robbery and forgery. it's been expanded beyond belief in its areas that have to be referred out of the chain of command. i won't even bother with that. awon't even bother with that. out of the chain of command. i won't even bother without. what im am saying, and i say as passionately as i came to my colleagues, that if we do not trust the commanding officers who take our young men and women into battle, our most precious asset, if w
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2013 11:00pm EST
you, it's going to turn around. don't think about it in a nuclear sense, but think strategic first, coming from great distance or no distance, to solve a problem. last, think about the conventional forces and moving and huge costs of standing armies and moving them to the problem. it's just the reality we have to deal with, and how we're going to do that, how are we going to afford it, those are the the questions, i think, that we're going to, as an alliance, come to grips with and understand how to do that; ours, we're not matching resources and capabilities with the security that we desire to have. >> thank you. >> other than that i'm in a good place. >> that leaves a good place. the leading expert brings a dose of reality, make it a concern, particularly such with europe. when you hear those speakers, particularly john cartwright's point about, you know, we have to be ability to exercise and leverage increasing speed and deploy our forces. do you see this happening in nato? is nato leveraging deemployability of the forces to provide adequate deterrent against threats from both n
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2013 4:00am EST
on recovery. don't see it as a source of crisis per se, simply because it is primarily an asset of the federal government and not frnl institutions. -- financial institutions. what it could be is another fiscal cost. i don't see it affecting the stability of the financial system anytime soon. but it is a serious issue and i think more thought needs to be given to helping people make better choices when they borrow to make sure that they are making good investments with the money that they borrow. >> we have come to the end of the panel. is there anything else that you want to add? good. let me thank all the people that have made this conference a success. the office. the panelists, i want to thank some of the organizers. t is a long list, finally, stan for giving us an excuse for putting this conference together and we learned a lot. thank you very much, stan. [applause] >> today on spnch span, texas governor rick perry speaking at a fundraiser in iowa. and examining prayers before government meetings and your calls and the newspaper deadlines live on washington journal. on the next "washingto
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2013 12:30am EST
of the legal advisers because their work for the court is absolutely crucial. i don't think it's well understood by anybody outside the court and the role they play is extremely important, and i hope that, perhaps, to have a humanist talk about them and their role and where it fits in everything, so one time thing, jim eluded to this, but it's my view that we should all keep in mind when talking about foreign intelligence collection, foreign -- the function of the agencies charged with that responsibility, and then the activity of the judiciary, a limited activity under the foreign intelligence surveillance act, that if you look at article ii, and, of course, that's the article and constitution that establishes the office of the president and gives the president his responsibilities and authority, you don't find the word "judge" in there at all. now, this is a very unique circumstance where the third branch actually plays a role in overseeing the activities of the executive in app area in which the executive constitutionally has exclusive responsibility, the conduct of our foreign aff
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2013 12:00pm EST
what happened on that mtv stage which is why i don't watch it. >> at the same time i would hazard to guess that it's by the lack of real culture that is in their heads all the time. so it is something to think about. so in your own efforts to share your knowledge and experience and love is a culture is an important thing. and i think that creating those moments is super important. if it is just your little cousin. there's an incredible archive of everything that has been created and that is also amazing. >> i find it that so many of them find stuff that i didn't even know about. so i think the work that you do one-on-one and what we all have to do is important and young creative minds are absorbing it all and unlike the kind of commercial sort of regurgitation of something that has already happened, they are going to process it if they have access to it an interesting and exciting ways. thank you so much. [applause] >> please join me again in thinking farah griffin and sharifa rhodes-pitts for this conversation. i want to remind you of their books are on sale at the gift shop and
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2013 10:00am EST
than directed against the homeland. that is not to say that we still don't face a threat, and it's certainly not to say that home grown violent extremists are inconsequential. far from it. >> i've always tell that our strongest -- felt that our strongest line of defense against these threats really is a strong intelligence-gathering capability. to what extempt has, you know, the nsa disclosures, how extensive is has the harm been in terms of those intelligence-gathering capabilities? director olsen? >> i would echo the comments recently of director clapper who characterized them as extremely damaging. there's no doubt that those disclosures have made our job harder. we've seen that terrorists, our adversaries are seeking to learn about the ways that we collect intelligence and seeking to adapt ask change the -- and change the ways they communicate in order to avoid our surveillance. so it's made our job significantly harder. >> how cowe repair the damage of it? director comey? what does congress need to do? what do we need to resist, potentially? >> i agree with what matt said ab
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2013 2:00pm EST
that they won. they didn't. we don't live in a capitalistic system we live in a corporate system. we don't live in a country that is fully socially conservative. we live in a country that is living on social issues. we understand that upheld at all that we have to fight and really centering on president obama as he is the bad guy. imagine her a moment that obama were impeached as so many conservatives seem to want. joe biden takes over. how is joe biden different than barack obama in any way even that he's less competent than the current president? joe biden has the same policy deceptions and sodas for the reclaimed him. so i think there is a broad movement that has to be fought. on the republican side, there are a lot of interesting candidates. an interesting guy, ron paul also i disagree with him strenuously on his foreign policy. allen west is an interesting night. his image matters. allen west is somebody that cuts an interesting figure for the republican party. there's other folks. mike pence of indiana. he's kind of laid low so far but i'm hoping he will throw his hat in the ring. one thi
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2013 4:00pm EST
are not proud of or don't like. you are always drawn to the thing that question invites you to say every one in the world hated us. so this is true. i've done things that have been universally hated but i have quietly loved. and they are always liked little limericks that you wrote for someone's birthday party that fell flat when you delivered them that you but you actually thought they were sort of sly and in genius. it's that kind of thing i feel most proud of. i am sure that by the time i am an old man i will look back on my efforts and hang my head. i'm sure that is inevitable as it is for all of us. sure, in the front row. >> you talked about the legacy in your talk and i was wondering how as a country we go about reconciling those that we may have angered the international community. >> that is a really good question. the question is if you create anger leaves a residue of anger and illegitimacy how do you go about correcting that. i tell a story in my book -- i'm finally mentioning my book at one hour and 15 minutes into this book talk. [laughter] a toy story in davidand goliath about
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2013 2:00am EDT
be a consequence or -- the point that i'm getting at is a mandated, this is going to happen if you don't self-report. and mr. contractor, we don't know this. it's your job to help us enforce. it is your job to report back to us, and if you don't, black mark on you. you won't be a government contractor very long. and so that's -- that's the level at which i have passion for this issue, that we should not be letting -- when we give them the good housekeeping seal of approval, which is what this security clearance is, that ought to mean something. and if they breach it, that ought for something that we consider very serious with very serious consequences. and so i applaud your work. i would like to know how many have actually been discharged or disciplined for either lying on applications. obviously they wouldn't get the clearance. but not reporting after the fact. mr. chairman, again, thank you for the time. >> thanks. those were tough questions. senator mccaskill. >> i think one of the most revealing things this morning is the realization that while an arrest report may be part of a background
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2013 9:00pm EST
or maim another human being, a chemical that could kill or maim a human being? i don't understand where the disconnect is in terms of our federal or state system. >> justice sotomayor i think it gets down to the difference between raache and lopez which this court is held as a classic and rational way to regulate commerce to basically prohibit certain items from congress. >> there is no dispute that these chemicals were transported along interstate lines. that's not even disputed in this case. >> i don't think it was disputed and lopez that the firearm would have had to cross-state lines but the problem and lopez was the federal statute was not sure it should in a way that had jurisdictional nexus that made the statute applicable. >> we could take this case to decide the commerce clause issue did it? it asserts it now but as we take the case the issue is whether the treaty supported the laws. >> that's right justice scalia and we think the government like a private party can weigh the constitutional argument. on the other hand i would say we are not particularly concerned about the comm
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2013 6:00am EST
to the second circuit or satisfactory to you? because you don't accept the second circuit's approach. >> well, we've tried to sort out the totality of the circumstances to make it clearer. >> what my question was >> i'm talking about what would be-19 >> your theory, and you say existing situation violates the constitution. so what changes do you think would need to be made >> we think >> that would bring this within the constitutional boundary? >> we think the town needs a policy. the policy should give guidelines to chaplains that say: stay away from points in which believers are known to disagree. and we think the town should do what it can to ameliorate coercion. it should tell the clergy: don't ask people to physically participate. that's the most important thing. the government suggests disclaimers might help. we think that's right. the government suggests separating the prayer a bit more in time. some states put their prayer before the call to order. the prayer could even be five minutes before the beginning of the meeting. the coercion can't be entirely eliminated, but the gratuitous c
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2013 12:00pm EST
this together. in a baritone voice he would say if you can't say something good about someone, don't say anything. there was so much respect for this man but along with a philip randolph, who organized the brotherhood of sleeping car porters, represented the men working on the railroad. and when you come to washington and walked through the union station there is a bus. you have martin luther king jr. who was the president of the southern christian leadership conference born in atlanta georgia and then there was roy wilkins, the head of the naacp for the advancement of colored people that were born in minnesota, a wonderful man comed then there was whitney young who was born in kentucky, the dean of social work at atlanta university and later became the head of the national urban league. there was another man by the name of james farmer. farmer had attended the little wiley college in texas, why we texas. and he was part of the dating team -- debate team. they deviated harvard and they won. the graduate study at harvard university became very involved with the naacp and was later one of
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2013 6:00pm EST
phonet so you don't interrupt the inven . with that, let me get dirty. i am shannon o'neil. i work at the council on foreign relations very focused on next month america more broadly unedited and pleasure tonight at talking with two wonderful gentleman, who have written wonderful books are really impressive impressive books about mexico. the first one on my right is ricardo ainslie. his book is called "the fight to save juarez." this book tells the story of the border city, which many of you know i've had the unfortunate tension in recent years of being not only the most violent place in mexico, but by some accounts the most spineless in the world. he tells the story of this descent into darkness of this border city through the eyes and through the stories of many people in morris, the mayor from 20,722,010. it is a newspaper photographer who patrols the streets and shows up at the house and the grandstands. it is the mistress of a mid-level cartel operator. and finally a human rights activist that is thrown in to those trying to make sense of it and protects the people inside for
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2013 10:00pm EST
of the attention of the popular robert frost but we don't have that division in the same way you don't discover another rockwell matt, do you? >> you said in the war halted id think there were different rockwells for different people with sentimentality and makes me want to write another book i think his subjects were misunderstood during his lifetime he often painted people getting along the humanitarian side of america if you go look at the freedom of speech there will be a lot of years and eyes fragmentary because that painting is about looking and listening. why did i say that? because of the etf of community may be struck people in the '60s as sentimental but now at a time when the real from the government shut down and the pettiness of american politics we pnc that humanitarian ideals. i think he did like the idea of people coming together. he liked everyone to get along. look at the freedom of speech. that lincoln figure rising up he isn't wearing a wedding ring if he might be in integrity is new in town i know he is supposed to be greek or italian but uc the wedding ring their older and
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2013 4:59am EST
if we had the constitution, right, don't you think? [ applause ] the fact that three-quarters of all immigrants now fighting a great battle in this town are women and children. you know all of those things. but those are ten. i just picked arbitrarily, so i dare anybody to say that this revolution is over because now we are on to the ways of denormalizing violence and dominance. we're understanding that we'll never have democratic countries unless we have democratic families. we're understanding that the idea of conquering nature and women is the problem and not the solution. we're returning to the original and natural paradigm of 95% of human history which was the circle, not the pyramid, not the hierarchy. as bella abzug would say, our movement came from a period of dependence. we were dependent. so we naturally had to get up there and become independent and self-identified, and now we're ready for a declaration of interdependence, of interdependence among our movements and within each other. we are discovering that we in this room and everywhere else and we in nature and we human
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2013 10:00am EST
about secrecy, i don't think you can draw from the fact that we want the program to continue the conclusion that the program should never have been secret. there are many intelligence programs that operate more effectively when they are not known because disclosure of what we obtain and how we obtain it can enable a hour adversaries to avoid or take steps to avoid what we are doing. that said, that doesn't mean that once they become disclosed, they are entirely ineffective. there is no question in my mind that this program is at least potentially less useful now than it would have been before the disclosure. whether it is actually less useful or not is going to take time to determine. but, you know, going forward obviously we have declassified and released the last two quarters of the fisa court and we are under the president's direction in a more forward leaning mode with respect to transparency. but we still come as a sort of custodian of the intelligence apparatus that protect the nation, we still have to be sensitive all the time to the fact that disclosures do risk compr
CSPAN
Nov 14, 2013 9:00pm EST
an exposure to potential terrorists that we don't currently have. the risk reward equation is difficult at gao and ig have pointed out given my experience in law enforcement and national security, i know how it works and so i'm a strong advocate because i don't want to take away a security that may identify the next punitive terrorists who may decide they want to get to an airport in the u.s. to do something bad. >> well i would love to have at least a statement or analysis on our return of investment on the $200 plus million. let me just say this in my final few minutes. because -- few seconds. because i know that we've made a lot of statements about the incident at la x and you and i talked on the phone. when we talk about response time and when we talk about what could have been done to do things circhtly -- differently and prevent loss of life. i think the other side my colleague on the other side all the time remind us we can't be everything to everybody. we don't have the money to pay for it. it's unf
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2013 12:00am EST
that is required, that should keep you occupied for the next -- >> i don't think it was thought that fiscal audit was conspicuously austere in the. prior to 2007 and 2008. i think it is hard to construct a counterfactual for the. 2007 with no -- 2003- 2007 with no bubbles and reasonably rapid growth. since the bubbles are now seen as having been the cause of significant fraction of the growth that there was, what shock could drive equilibrium and low interest rates down. the me mention two. the first, your sphere of expertise, something ben wrote about some years ago when he spoke about the savings glut, the substantial flow of capital nations tosurplus desire for some reason to accumulate reserves on a substantial scale. that is one answer. second answer, which i am inclined to think is more important is this -- the canonical capital good of our and isthe computer information technology. the relative price of information technology relative to everything else goes down 20% every year. is same amount of savings producing vastly more capital than it used to. whatever the right savings investment b
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2013 2:00am EST
to repeal this bill. i get that. i understand you've delayed whole sections of it but don't want to delay the individual mandate for instance. my question is there r there any changes you want to recommend we could make to this bill so that the promises that were made by the president, by yourself, by others for these people, promises which clearly are not being kept could actually in fact be kept? are there any that you would recommend to us? >> senator, i'd be happy to work with members of congress who want to achieve the goals of the bill which are to provide for the first time affordable health coverage for millions of people who don't have it and an additional goal of the bill i would say is to in the marketplace, the last remaining market where people have been denied coverage because about a quarter of the people who seek insurance can't get it at all, medically underwritten, denied because of preexisting condition where they have an opportunity to move forward. if there is some framework that is you have in mind, what i really want to do is get the program up and running and get i
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2013 4:00am EST
-benefit analysis is that what we're talking about, sir? >> no. i mean, that would be a part of that. you don't have -- >> yeah. >> you don't know for sure. because you don't have a model for the technology. >> no, but we know the industry sees ccs technology as a pathway forward. we also see it as one available to it in ones we're hoping with d.o.e. assistance it will continue to progress and get less and less expensive. that's how technology gets developed. but in this case, all of the components of ccs as well as those together have been demonstrated over and over as being viable and effective and we believe they will be the path forward for coal. coal is a big pot of our energy supply. i know, it's going to continue to be a big pot of our energy supply. we've tried very hard to make sure that we look at the technologies available to it today so it continues to have a path forward. >> but we don't tend use research funds for things that are already been determined adequately demonstrated? we're using research funds to try to prove this up you're using it as an example adequately demonstrated. it
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
on in that individual market. maybe we don't have a number or today, but it would be great to get that data and if we ave to get it from insurers we should have a number about what that annual rate has been my sense is we are probably following that pretty today. ame people are saying what is normal churn in the individual and trying to site it as the end all, be all problem and anyway to shed light on those issues. of the the discussion individual market, the data again that continues to be itedes our projection of what would happen with the affordable care account is a look back at market. somewhere between 40 and 60% of turn over on a regular basis. individual market contracts are year so it's not unusual to policy or e same practice a year later. they're an continuous work benefit. individuals who are in the market want to get insurance. don't have a workplace insurance and they're not medicare eligible and not a veteran. they want insurance, and often truggle with not only price increases at about 16% a year average but everyone is edically underwritten so any illness or disease could block you
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2013 4:00pm EDT
was too dangerous. it is still a dangerous place, by the way. i don't want to sound pollyanna here. i don't want to underestimate the difficulties. my main point is that things have changed significantly for the better in afghanistan and the american people sadly don't know it. american itself, part of the the university itself. it started with 53 student 300idate is now at 1000 and of them are women. they have a broad number of courses. new just recently opened a campus in a center for economic women development established ith the department of defense would love to make that off the record that i can't. i'm sure some of my colleagues are wondering why we are using department of defense dollars to open up a women's economic element school. why is that not usaid binstead of d.o.d? it adds to the security of the country but the answer is, basically, the dod does a number of things including the expenditures which help the development of that country which is so essential to the security. , the town meeting that i had there, one student who talked about his life experience when the taliban
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2013 8:00pm EDT
is there any issue that is not contained within the question? >> i don't think so. >> taking the two cases together , yeah. in the common law case they didn't reach at least the majority did not reach. that's simply about corporate free exercise but in the third circuit case both issues are discussed. >> if we decide that the gilardis could bring this suit as individuals but we don't think the corporations have the free exercise right what happens to the injection? how does that work? >> is currently in place. >> in other words and injunction would be issued by the district court. how would that work? >> that's an interesting question your honor. you would have decided the gilardis could bring a case as individuals and presumably the strict scrutiny that the government has not carried its burden. the injunction would be against the government enforcing the mandate. it would make sense if it's not also applicable to corporations obviously. >> there's a soul procedure that covers that talks about injunctions being binding not only on the individual but in favor of this case the gilardis but
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2013 6:30am EST
don't sacrifice sovereignty. we don't change in the american loss to advance our interests and we advance our brand and value system. i thank you for giving me an opportunity to share those thoughts with you. >> thank you. senator flake. >> thank you. if i could follow-up with regard to the case the supreme court is currently hearing, on the versus u.s. mr. thornburgh, were you surprised when you heard the federal government was actually suing -- or using treaty or convention in order to bring charges against an individual, a chemical weapons treaty? were you surprised this was used in this fashion? >> yes. >> if you're surprised by that, what can reassure us that you won't be surprised that this treaty is used for similar purpose? >> i think by that time the supreme court would've thrown out data, the basis for it. >> but the fact it even brought and it's survived one challenge, gone up one level as well. >> let me mention that it's sad to say the department justice doesn't always act wisely. and that there are occasions when mistakes are made in the pursuing of cases and controv
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2013 6:30am EST
thank you all for coming. we don't want to break the microphone. it's a nice, cold, clear day in washington and i think it's the same in geneva, and i had trouble tearing myself away from twitter this once i hope that there is news from their you will, someone who is on twitter here in the audience will let us know. clearly there is a connection, however, between what is going on in geneva and what is happening here. if there is a nuclear agreement, if there's an improvement in relations between the united states and iran, between iran and the western community in general, that is going to have an impact on iran's role in the region. and we are focusing today on iran and its eastern neighbors, specifically afghanistan, pakistan and india. while iran is often considered a middle eastern country, in fact, it's historically its cultural ties are as strong if not stronger with its eastern neighbors, with afghanistan and south asia. and, of course, iran will be a pivotal player as it has been all along in afghanistan, especially next year as the united states and nato began to with
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2013 8:30am EST
cause showing. once it is made we have to issue the order, don't have the discretion to second-guess the government's purposes or reasons. it acts very much like a search warrant or title iii order. that onequent occasions infrequent occasions -- jim baker -- on infrequent indications -- john baker would be the one who did it. technique, if something new or unusual about this takes it outside of the ordinary -- really quite straightforward and typical, routine fisa application. the government would do that, they would do it for good reasons because they knew we had entrusted integrity to function in -- to function effectively and have the confidence to know what they are saying to us. that requirement became codified in the first draft of 2008 with the foreign intelligence surveillance court whirls. -- surveillance court rules. it seems to me to be a good trigger point for a judge to exercise his or her discretion or perhaps for congress to mandate when that notice is given, but then the court calls upon what i would envision to be three small codger i of cleared attorneys, pro
CSPAN
Nov 14, 2013 5:00am EST
've attempted to taylilor our rules. we don't expect perfection. we're looking for good faith compliance, good faith efforts to come into substantial compliance by that date. >> the of consumer complaint database has been updated for a year. can you describe what safeguards have been put in place to make sure that the data is reliable. how do you envision it being used going forward? >> so, we have iterated that process. some of the concerns about the database in the early going were valid. when have you a small amount of information, not clear it's reflective or representative of what's going on in the country. when you get to having a larger amount, it's kind of like pixels on a tv screen. the more there are, the more into focus the picture becomes. we've received more than 230,000 complaints and the picture is coming into much sharper focus. we continue to improve the system for verifying the relationship between the business organization and the consumer who is complaining. we don't put things into the database until they move through the entire process. we've had give-and-take with the in
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2013 6:00am EST
should stop and pause over this. how could it be? they don't get any leverage on us, we get a lot of leverage on them. on the face of it seems a little bit implausible. if it were true our ratifying a treaty like this gives us leverage on other countries, our having ratified the conventional civil and political rights which we have ratified would give us leverage to make sure there is free speech in countries like north corey and cuba, both of which are public riots, it would allow us to make sure there is freedom of religion in china, pakistan, part of that convention. we should remind ourselves if we make a promise saying we are promising it doesn't mean anything because you can't force us they can make the same promise in the same spirit, we signed on to this but you can't force us to do anything. this is a little bit optimistic because people find this convention that they will implement it. the only way in which it can beat american leverage if we twist their arm and say we can't expect you to do it, we should pause over that too. a lot of countries in the world have real ser
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2013 10:00pm EST
to nobody, appeals to nobody. it really is not something that and benefit the world frankly i don't believe it would benefit iran. the problem with iran -- not the roblem, the challenge with iran, iran is not the country which you can bully. way.imply doesn't work that if you look at what iran excels olympics, it's wrestling and weight lifting. really, i'm serious. a country that's very, very nationalistic but has a self.g sense of i told people if you go to teheran, i'm sure you all will point, your host will ake you to something called a zuhrhana. it's a house of strength where people do sort of synchronized lifting. it's very, very interesting. the point i'm making is not a countrys is that gives in well to -- they of a strong sense themselves. nationalistic. here's a sort of a marshal quality there. it doesn't work. what's so interesting about the yet again an opportunity for some type of eaceful resolution of our differences with iran emerges. again, i'm skeptical because i'm skeptical. we middle east specialists are ind of the oncologists of middle east studies. invariably, we're wro
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2013 10:30am EST
the system got a lot bigger since 9/11. is it the right size? i don't know. i don't know if it's the right size. but i know i'm not the person, or if i were a member of congress now or even as the slowly beat up president and ceo of the wilson center -- just getting -- i'm not the person to decide what the size is. i'm much better at deciding the safeguards so that whatever size it is, there aren't abuses. it and i'm pretty persuaded we have to have a haystack. i don't know what should be in it. if the question is should everything be in it though, everything shouldn't be in it. what are the right things? somebody, again, with more technical knowledge should decide is subject to review by the court, the fisa court and maybe the supreme court ultimately depending how we structured this and i in for supreme court review so there has to be standing and provided for somehow. and the congress. congress after all rights of the law so maybe that is an oversimplified version of it. but, back to the harvard law school student -- i trust our government subject to safeguards to do the right thing to
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2013 3:00pm EST
school ready to succeed and those who don't has serious implications for our country's future. though historically we've investevested in education to ba path to middle class, we are now falling behind. we now rank 28th globally in the proportion of 4-year-olds enrolled in pre-k and 25th global any public funding for early learning. that cannot continue. so, mr. president, in the coming weeks and months, i'll be working with my chairman, senator harkin, who is here today, with many others to work towards making some smart investments in our education system to move this legislation forward. our country is in very large part the product of decisions that were made decades ago. the decision to make public education a priority now will have an extraordinary impact on the next generation. we are choosing every day between being a country that is struggling to catch up or being a country that has the knowledge and the power to continue to lead. thank you, mr. president. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator louisiana. mr. vitter: thank you, mr. pre
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2013 7:00pm EST
>> on the second, on the special operations, i don't know exactly the intent. madelyn can probably address that better. from a standpoint of relevance, the special operations versus a heavy brigade, today, for the reality we live in, is a lot more relevant to the defense capabilities of nato and europe. >> i'm going to dodge that one and go after the other one. but i think that the nato dpr clearly put forth nato's view as far as being part of an alliance and the fact that there clearly are nuclear weapons that the u.s. assigned to nato, is something that both the hlg, the npg, all the rest of the bodies that nato looks at, and with a good deal of sear yourness. on the one hand there's been, particularly over the last six months-ish, a creation of an arms control committee, as well as with the hlg. the beginning of, okay, what do we need to do to look at confidence-building measures, transparency measures in a way that will inspire some -- reciprocal actions on the part of russia as far as the foundation for reduction. so that's out there. but the commitment on the part of the alli
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